Uncategorized

Planning for Full Enrollment Using PIR and Census Data

On February 7th I had the honor of presenting at the Region IV Head Start Association’s 2017 Annual Training Conference. The title of my presentation was “Planning for full enrollment using PIR and Census data.” The synopsis provided in the conference’s program is below.

How many Head Start eligible children are in Region IV? Where do those children live and is Head Start serving them? Using Region IV as a model, attendees will learn how to analyze economic and demographic trends and plan for full enrollment in the context of a community assessment.

The basics of the process presented were:

  • Key data points from the US Census and American Community Survey can be used to track trends in the Head Start eligible population.
  • These data points can be broken down geographically, from the state and county level on down to Census Tracts and zip codes.
  • These data points can then be compared horizontally (that is, over time) with key data from Program Information Reports.
  • Comparisons can then be made vertically (that is, comparing smaller geographies such as counties to the larger geographies that they are part of.)
  • Using these geographical and time based analyses programs can show where the Head Start eligible population is growing, where the population is under served, and where resources should be allocated.

An example of a discovery from this analysis for Region IV is that the region is underfunded when compared to the rest of the United States. Region IV has about 43.5 funded Head Start slots for every 100 estimated eligible children while the United States has just over 50 funded Head Start slots for every 100 estimated eligible children. Tennessee, a state within Region IV, is even more under funded with about 41.5 funded Head Start slots for every 100 estimated eligible children.

region-iv_funded_as_percent_of_eligible
Early Childhood Analytics – Funded Enrollment as a % of Head Start Eligible Children – Tennessee, Region IV and the United States compared. Data sources: 5-year ACS derived estimates from the US Census and aggregated PIR data from the Office of Head Start.

Download the presentation

A full PDF of the presentation along with all background data used to produce the analysis of Region IV can be found at following Google Drive folder. Also included is state by state expanded economic data.

Region IV Presentation Google Drive Folder: Planning for Full Enrollment Using Census and PIR Data.

Your program’s data

I offered to all attendees an overview of their program’s service area at the county level. Contact me with your program’s name and the counties you serve to receive your demographic overview. This overview will include a table showing the follwing 2009-2015 data for your county:

  • Population
  • Percent of the population under the age of 5
  • Estimated number of children under the age of 5
  • Poverty rate for families with children under the age of 5
  • Estimated number of Head Start and Early Head Start eligible children
  • The number of eligible children enrolled in your Head Start program (compare this to the estimated number of Head Start eligible children above)
  • The number of over income children enrolled in your Head Start program
  • Your program’s funded enrollment

Also included will be a bar graph plotting your program’s enrollment and funded enrollment compared to the estimated Head Start eligible population. For an example, see the graph for Region IV below.

head-start-region-iv_enrollment_graph
Early Childhood Analytics – Estimated Head Start eligible population (derived from the 5-Year American Community Survey) compared to Region IV actual enrollment and funded enrollment (from aggregated Program Information Report Data produced by the Office of Head Start)

I provide full Community Assessment planning, analysis and writing as well as accessible, affordable Demographic Reports for Head Start programs. Contact me if you would like a bid proposal for your Head Start program.

2015, American Community Survey, Head Start Big Data, Program Information Reports, Region 1, Region I

2015 ACS data released – Head Start Region I case study

2015 1-Year American Community Survey (ACS) data was released on September 15, 2016. The ACS, produced by the US Census Bureau, is a primary source of demographic, economic and social characteristics of American families, households and individuals. This data is important for Head Start programs, and can be used to complete or update a triennial Community Assessment and determine the level of need for Head Start services within a service area or recruitment area. The 1-year data is only available at the state and federal level, but subsequent releases of 3-year and 5-year data will cover all geographies down to the zip code and census tract level.

To demonstrate the importance of ACS data and the power of a well crafted analysis we will be looking at Head Start Region I data and comparing it to publicly available data from Head Start Program Information Reports (publicly available here). This analysis is for an entire Head Start region encompassing multiple states; but the specific data points remain the same at all levels, whether you are looking at a poverty rate for a town, city, county, state or region as a whole. This analysis applies to Head Start programs of any size. All tables and graphs can be reproduced for any Head Start service area.

map-region1

Region I Overview

Head Start Region I includes the states of Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. ACS data includes thousands of data points across hundreds of tables. The most important data points for the purposes of a Head Start Community Assessment or for Head Start planning purposes include:

  1. Table S0101 – Age and Sex:
    • Population
    • Percent of the population under the age of 5
  2. Table DP03 – Selected Economic Characteristics:
    • Poverty rate for families with children under the age of 5

These data points are available for all geographies in the ACS, though some geographies may only be available for the 3-year or 5-year ACS and not the 1-year ACS. (Confused? See the difference between the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year ACS here.) These data points from the ACS can be combined to create what is called a derived estimate, that is an estimate created by combining one or more data points from the ACS. Here we will use the population, the percentage of the population under the age of 5, and the poverty rate for families with children under the age of 5 to create a derived estimate of the number of Head Start and Early Head Start eligible children in Region 1. This results in the following:

Region 1
1-Year American Community Survey
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Population 14,429,720 14,457,499 14,492,360 14,562,704 14,618,806 14,680,722 14,727,584
% under 5 5.8% 5.5% 5.4% 5.3% 5.2% 5.2% 5.2%
Total under 5* 831,252 794,430 779,302 778,874 766,690 767,971 765,221
Poverty rate 8.5% 10.1% 10.2% 9.3% 8.8% 8.7% 8.1%
Head Start eligible children* 42,421 47,905 47,717 43,228 40,357 40,202 36,997
Early Head Start eligible children* 63,633 71,859 71,577 64,844 60,536 60,306 55,498
* derived estimate

Region I is experiencing an overall drop in the estimated number of Head Start and Early Head Start eligible children. Driving this trend is a decrease in the percentage of the population under the age of 5 and a decrease in the poverty rate for young families. That poverty rate has dropped by 2.15 percentage points since 2011 and the estimated number of Head Start eligible children has dropped by about 10,700 over 2011 to 2015; a 22.5% decline.

Comparing Program Information Report data and ACS data

These are just estimates based on sampled data, so it’s best to corroborate this data with another source. One of the best sources available is internal Head Start data which can be found in Program Information Reports (PIR.) 2015-2016 PIR data is not yet available, but we can match up previous year’s data with the ACS estimates to compare trends. Funded enrollment, cumulative enrollment, and the portion of cumulative enrollment that qualified as income or categorically eligible can all be compared to the ACS derived estimates.

esths-eligible-over-bar
ACS and PIR Data – Enrollment data compared to the estimated number of Head Start eligible children. PIR data is matched with ACS data by the beginning of the PIR’s school year. So 2014-2015 school year data is matched with 2014 ACS data and so on. 2015-2016 PIR data was not available at the time of publication.
Region I ACS Derived Estimates:
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Head Start eligible children* 42,421 47,905 47,717 43,228 40,357 40,202 36,997
Region I PIR Data; Head Start only:
2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Funded Enrollment 26,790 26,492 26,556 26,209 22,773 24,069 N/A
Cumulative Enrollment 31,857 31,280 31,075 30,408 26,567 27,881 N/A
Eligible Enrollment 28,615 28,086 27,724 27,102 23,675 24,736 N/A

What doe this data tell you, exactly?

It tells us how well Head Start Region 1 is serving it’s eligible population. For 2014, there were about 60 funded Head Start slots for every 100 estimated eligible children, and Head Start programs in Region 1 enrolled about 88.7% of all eligible children.

It also tells us about enrollment trends over time. Across all programs in Head Start Region I, total funded enrollment has contracted by 9.1% over the 5 years between the 2011 and 2015 PIR. Cumulative enrollment is down 10.9% and the number of eligible children enrolled is down 12.1% over the same time period. This trend is less pronounced than the 22.5% drop in the estimated Head Start eligible population.

Region I data broken down

The data for Region I above was created by aggregating state level data. But it’s also useful to compare the states within Region I to one another to identify outliers and areas that are driving the trends we see at a regional level. If you were doing this sort of analysis for a smaller area, you might break down a county into it’s individual towns and cities; or a city into zip codes or census tracts.

Estimated Head Start eligible children by state in Region I

est_hs_graph

Estimated number of Head Start Eligible Children
1-Year ACS Derived Estimates
State 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Maine 5,353 5,163 6,083 6,566 4,284 6,126 3,751
Vermont 2,457 2,291 2,504 1,978 2,069 1,706 1,153
New Hampshire 4,035 3,670 3,119 2,958 2,726 4,030 2,631
Connecticut 11,061 10,736 11,343 9,771 8,386 8,158 8,888
Massachusetts 16,826 22,179 19,854 18,861 19,371 15,881 17,170
Rhode Island 2,689 3,866 4,814 3,094 3,521 4,301 3,404

Looking at the estimated number of Head Start eligible children by state within Region I shows that Connecticut and Massachusetts have the vast majority of eligible children. Though all states have declining eligible populations, Vermont and Maine have dropped at the fastest rate, losing 54% and 38.3% of their eligible population over the past 5 years.

Poverty rate for families with children under 5 by state in Region I

povertyrategraph
1-Year American Community Survey – Poverty Rate for Families with Children Under Age 5 – Table DP03
Poverty rate for families with children under 5
1-Year ACS – Table DP03
State 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Maine 18.8% 18.7% 22.9% 24.7% 16.8% 24.5% 14.7%
Vermont 19.0% 17.6% 20.4% 15.8% 17.2% 13.9% 9.6%
New Hampshire 13.6% 13.4% 11.6% 11.2% 10.3% 15.5% 10.3%
Connecticut 13.1% 13.4% 14.4% 12.6% 11.0% 10.7% 11.9%
Massachusetts 11.0% 15.1% 13.7% 12.9% 13.4% 10.9% 11.7%
Rhode Island 11.2% 17.0% 21.6% 13.9% 16.1% 19.6% 15.8%

The poverty rate for families with children under the age of 5 is typically the biggest factor that changes the estimated number of Head Start eligible children over time. Maine, Vermont, Rhode Island and New Hampshire have all shown very volatile poverty rates while Massachusetts and Connecticut have remained more steady. This is probably because Massachusetts and Connecticut are much larger by population. This results in a larger sample pool for the ACS to draw from and lower margins of error. Trends over time are important to keep in mind when you suspect high margins of error in your data. In this case, all 6 states have a 5 year downward trend in their poverty rate for young families. As with the estimated number of Head Start eligible children, Maine and Vermont have the biggest 5 year change for their poverty rate, dropping by 8.2 and 10.8 percentage points respectively.

Percent of the population under 5 by state in Region I

percent5_graph
Percentage of the Population Under Age 5 – 1-Year ACS – Table S0101
Percentage of population under 5
1-Year ACS – Table S0101
State 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Maine 5.4% 5.2% 5.0% 5.0% 4.8% 4.7% 4.8%
Vermont 5.2% 5.2% 4.9% 5.0% 4.8% 4.9% 4.8%
New Hampshire 5.6% 5.2% 5.1% 5.0% 5.0% 4.9% 4.8%
Connecticut 6.0% 5.6% 5.5% 5.4% 5.3% 5.3% 5.2%
Massachusetts 5.8% 5.6% 5.5% 5.5% 5.4% 5.4% 5.4%
Rhode Island 5.7% 5.4% 5.3% 5.3% 5.2% 5.2% 5.1%

Changes in the percentage of the population under the age of 5 have been less drastic than the other variables in this analysis. The states with the biggest change in this variable over the past 5 years are New Hampshire and Connecticut, each with a .3 point drop in the percentage of the population under the age of 5.

Conclusion and Next Steps

The estimated number of Head Start eligible children in Region I has steadily dropped since at least 2010, shrinking by 22.5%. Head Start programs in the region have still managed to enroll about 55 to 60% of this eligible population every year. Though total cumulative enrollment is also down, it has only dropped by 10.9% over the past 5 years, or half as fast as the drop in the eligible population. Vermont and Maine in particular have seen the largest declines in their Head Start eligible populations.

Next steps for Region 1 would be to compare state level PIR data on enrollment to ACS data. In particular it would be interesting to see the saturation of services in Vermont and Maine as well as their cumulative enrollment. It would also be beneficial to compare Region 1 to neighboring regions to provide context for enrollment levels, poverty rates and other data points.

This same analysis can be done on programs of any size. PIR data is available at the programmatic level, and ACS data is available down to the Census Tract level. Questions? Comments? Leave them in the comments or contact me!

American Community Survey, Head Start, Program Information Reports, Regioin XI, Region 11, Service Area Demographics

Tlingit & Haida Head Start Demographic Report

Prepared by Early Childhood Analytics

This report uses data from the 5-Year American Community Survey (ACS) to find demographic estimates for Region 11 AI/AN Head Start Programs. Tables DP03, S0101 and B17001A-I are used for the geography All American Indian Areas/Alaska Native Areas/Hawaiian Home Lands within United States. It combines these estimates with data from Program Information Reports from the Head Start Enterprise System. If there is no data or limited data in the tables and graphs below then there was not a large enough sample size for the service area for the ACS to produce reliable estimates. This report is an excerpt of a longer version which includes, among other things:

  • Median family income and income distribution for the service area
  • Households receiving SSI, SNAP Benefits/Food Stamps, and cash public assistance
  • Interactive map with data overlays by Zip Code & by recruitment area
  • Children with disabilities

Contact Early Childhood Analytics if you would like to inquire about receiving the full demographic report for your program.

Tlingit & Haida Head Start: Estimated Head Start Eligible Children

The poverty rate for families with children under the age of 5 was 11.6% for 2014, the latest year for which there is data. This is up from 11.5% in 2010. Using the poverty rate, population, and the percentage of the population under the age of 5, an estimate for the number of Head Start eligible children can be computed. In 2014 there was an estimated 135 Head Start eligible children living in the service area, up from 110 in 2010. With a total cumulative enrollment of 288 in 2014, Tlingit & Haida Head Start served approximately 213.3% of the estimated Head Start eligible population in its service area.

Tlingit & Haida Head Start 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015
Population 29464 29467 30642 30898 31481
Percent of population under 5 05.3% 05.3% 05.7% 06.2% 06.1%
Population under 5 1585 1564 1760 1919 1925
Poverty rate for young families 11.5% 11.8% 11.4% 11.2% 11.6%
Estimated number of Head Start eligible children 110 111 121 130 135
Total cumulative enrollment 306 288 278 269 288

Tlingit & Haida Head Start: Race/ethnicity of Head Start eligible children

The ACS provides an estimate of the number of children under 5 living in poverty by race. This can be compared to the racial/ethnic makeup of the Head Start program’s enrolled children. Note that Hispanic/Latino children are not included in the pie chart below as they may be of any race.

Tlingit & Haida Head Start Est. HS Eligible (ACS) Children Served (PIR)
2014 2014-2015
White 63 54
Black/African American 0 0
AI/AN 51 197
Asian 2 6
Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander 0 14
Some other race alone 6 0
Two or more races 49 10
White alone, not Hispanic/Latino 94 0
Hispanic of Latino 40 25

Contact Early Childhood Analytics to inquire about the full version of this report for your program.

American Community Survey, Head Start, Program Information Reports, Regioin XI, Region 11, Service Area Demographics

Taos Pueblo Head Start Demographic Report

Prepared by Early Childhood Analytics

This report uses data from the 5-Year American Community Survey (ACS) to find demographic estimates for Region 11 AI/AN Head Start Programs. Tables DP03, S0101 and B17001A-I are used for the geography All American Indian Areas/Alaska Native Areas/Hawaiian Home Lands within United States. It combines these estimates with data from Program Information Reports from the Head Start Enterprise System. If there is no data or limited data in the tables and graphs below then there was not a large enough sample size for the service area for the ACS to produce reliable estimates. This report is an excerpt of a longer version which includes, among other things:

  • Median family income and income distribution for the service area
  • Households receiving SSI, SNAP Benefits/Food Stamps, and cash public assistance
  • Interactive map with data overlays by Zip Code & by recruitment area
  • Children with disabilities

Contact Early Childhood Analytics if you would like to inquire about receiving the full demographic report for your program.

Taos Pueblo Head Start: Estimated Head Start Eligible Children

The poverty rate for families with children under the age of 5 was 37.5% for 2014, the latest year for which there is data. This is up from 20.1% in 2010. Using the poverty rate, population, and the percentage of the population under the age of 5, an estimate for the number of Head Start eligible children can be computed. In 2014 there was an estimated 43 Head Start eligible children living in the service area, up from 33 in 2010. With a total cumulative enrollment of 53 in 2014, Taos Pueblo Head Start served approximately 123.2% of the estimated Head Start eligible population in its service area.

Taos Pueblo Head Start 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015
Population 5258 5361 5290 4958 5181
Percent of population under 5 05.1% 03.2% 04.2% 03.7% 03.6%
Population under 5 273 176 227 188 191
Poverty rate for young families 20.1% 22.7% 28.6% 39.8% 37.5%
Estimated number of Head Start eligible children 33 24 39 45 43
Total cumulative enrollment 54 70 56 53 53

Race/ethnicity of Head Start eligible children

The ACS provides an estimate of the number of children under 5 living in poverty by race. This can be compared to the racial/ethnic makeup of the Head Start program’s enrolled children. Note that Hispanic/Latino children are not included in the pie chart below as they may be of any race.

2014 5-Year ACS – Children Under 5 in Poverty by Race

Taos Pueblo Head Start Est. HS Eligible (ACS) Children Served (PIR)
2014 2014-2015
White 18 22
Black/African American 0 0
AI/AN 7 31
Asian 0 0
Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander 0 0
Some other race alone 19 0
Two or more races 1 0
White alone, not Hispanic/Latino 1 0
Hispanic of Latino 55 26

Contact Early Childhood Analytics to inquire about the full version of this report for your program.

Uncategorized

Head Start 5-Year Grant Application Outline & Template

I recently had the privilege of working with an AI/AN Program on completion of their 5-year non competitive grant application. In organizing the grant writing process I followed an outline and instructions provided by a grants specialist from the Office of Head Start. The grants specialist presented at the 2015 NIHSDA Region XI Conference in Sacramento, California. Here is the outline of his presentation. It includes the instructions for the application along with further guidance and explanation from OHS.

I have adapted his presentation to a grant application template with a hyper-linked table of contents and full OHS instructions and guidance for each section included in embedded comments. The template is in Google Docs, and may be copied and used to complete your program’s 5-Year grant application.

In the template you will find all major sections of the grant application narrative (excluding the Budget section, which will be added later), sub-sections, questions, and sub-questions; all of the required topics you must cover in your 5-Year grant.

Grant Outline Screenshot

All topics within the grant application are hyper linked as sections in the table of contents in 5 heading levels (4 heading levels are shown in the above screenshot.) Further OHS instructions are in [brackets] and further explanations of each section are in comments linked to the highlighted text [What are you looking for?] All explanations, instructions, and comments are pulled from the aforementioned 5-Year grant presentation given at the 2015 NIHSDA Conference.

To use the template you can either:

  1. Click on “File” and “Make a Copy”. This allows you to make an exact duplicate of the document in Google Docs. Using the outline in Google Docs stores the file in Google Drive, and sharing settings can be altered to keep the document private, or share it with others to view, comment or collaborate on your 5-Year Grant application. This method is recommended if you are comfortable with using and collaborating on Google Docs.
  2. Click on “File” and “Download as”. This allows you to download the document as a Microsoft Word document (or other format) to store locally on your computer’s hard drive. Due to compatibility issues this may alter the layout of the outline. It also may make it difficult to update the Table of Contents automatically as this is a feature built into Google Docs with a third party application. This method is recommended if you are uncomfortable with collaborating on Google Docs and would like to work in a local copy of your grant application instead of one that is stored online.

If you have questions, comments, or are in need of assistance in completing your 5-Year Grant Application you can contact me.

Homelessness, Service Area Demographics

Cities, States Turn to Emergency Declarations to Tackle Homeless Crisis

Homeless

The Pew Charitable Trusts

Governments typically declare a state of emergency to deal with natural disasters like hurricanes and wildfires. But over the last two months, several West Coast cities and one state have used the declarations to tackle a worsening homeless crisis.

Hawaii, Los Angeles, Seattle and Portland, Oregon, have all declared states of emergency, using the proclamations as a way to loosen up funds or bypass ordinances to take swifter action.

Other cities and states across the country are also grappling with rising homelessness. With shelters at capacity, Washington, D.C., started housing families in motel rooms to help pre-empt the surge of people looking for winter shelter. In New York City, where most homeless people are housed in shelters, the city is looking to add 500 beds for the winter.

But the emergency declarations represent a new approach. One motivation is to publicize the problem, but officials say the declarations are more than a public relations gambit and will lead to big changes for the homeless in their cities.

“It has created a sense of emergency, and it describes the situation because we’re in a crisis. We’re galvanizing attention and getting the resources we need to address the problem,” said Greg Spiegel, homelessness policy director for the mayor of Los Angeles, Democrat Eric Garcetti.

In Hawaii, Democratic Gov. David Ige’s 60-day declaration extends contracts with homeless services providers and sets aside money for a family shelter. Kimo Carvalho of the Institute for Human Services, which describes itself as “the state’s homeless shelter,” said the declaration was intended to solve “a bureaucracy problem.”

“It’s a way for the government to do something about a problem actually happening now,” rather than waiting for the Legislature, Carvalho said.

Other homelessness advocates say the declarations are aimed at addressing a polarizing problem, but it’s too soon to know whether they will prove effective.

“These states of emergency are addressing a feeling people have. People are upset about the encampments and people on the street—whether it’s because they feel sorry for them or because they don’t like them,” said Nan Roman, president of the National Alliance to End Homelessness.

In some places, the declaration preceded concrete plans to address the problem.

Continue Reading….

2012 Data, 2013 Data, Head Start, Service Area Demographics, Web App Reports

El Paso County, CO – Head Start Demographics

Based on 5-Year American Community Survey (ACS) data from the US Census Bureau, El Paso County, CO has experienced a 16.8% increase in the number of estimated Head Start eligible children in it’s service area from 2010 to 2013. An increase in the overall population has been the primary cause of this increase, growing from about 588,500 in 2010 to 631,600 in 2013. There has also been a 1% point increase in the poverty rate for young families over the same time period. Funded enrollment has dropped over the same time period, with Community Partnership for Child Development Head Start reporting a drop from 1,034 funded Head Start slots in 2010 to 892 in 2013. An overview of El Paso County demographics is in the tables and charts below.

Sonoma County, CA – 2013 Estimated Head Start Eligible Children heat map
Sonoma County, CA – 2013 Estimated Head Start Eligible Children heat map
El Paso County ’10-’11 ’11-’12 ’12-’13 ’13-’14
Total Cumulative Enrollment* 1,259 1,291 1,263 1,116
Total Funded Enrollment* 1,034 1,034 1,034 892
Estimated Number of Head Start Eligible Children** 2,433 2,845 2,945 2,841
Poverty rate for families with children under the age of 5** 13.99% 15.43% 15.31% 15.10%
* PIR from Head Start Enterprise System        
** 5 Year American Community Survey from US Census Bureau      

More data from the 5-Year ACS can be found at Early Childhood Analytics web report. It includes:

  • Service Area totals: Population, population under 5, poverty rate for families with children under the age of 5 and estimated number of Head Start eligible children
  • Interactive map with data overlays by Zip Code & by recruitment area
  • 2010-2013 time line graph & table tracking the service area’s totals
  • Breakdown of the service area by Zip Code and by County
  • Racial characteristics and Hispanic or Latino/Not Hispanic or Latino table and graphs

Contact Us with questions or to request your program’s demographic report. The 2012 version of your program’s report is offered free of charge to demonstrate our capabilities.

Uncategorized

Head Start Designation Renewal System 2.0

NHSDA Executive Director Yasmina Vinci write on the Designation Renewal System at Huffington Post:

In 2007, Congress attempted to strengthen the accountability of Head Start programs by requiring open competition for Head Start grants in communities where local programs were not offering high-quality services.

Since 2011, the Office of Head Start has been implementing the Designation Renewal System (DRS) to put that goal into action, but the design of this system has led to a number of unproductive and unintended consequences.

This fall, as the third cycle of DRS closed, the National Head Start Association (NHSA) released Analysis of the Designation Renewal System: Cohorts One to Three, summarizing the outcomes for programs and communities thus far and highlighting opportunities to address those unintended consequences and make the DRS more effective. As the report concluded:

● The DRS still falls short of fully meeting the Congressional intent of targeting competition at poor quality grantees.
● Basic reforms are needed to make the DRS consistent, reasonable, and predictable.
● Conceptual reforms are needed to support programs in working toward high quality, not compliance.

Right now, the DRS requires programs to enter competition if they hit one or more of seven triggers. Overall, 74% of programs going into competition are currently getting their grants back at the end of a grueling 18-month process. Depending on what trigger caused them to compete, programs might be more or less likely than that to get their grant back. This confirms what the Head Start field knows to be true: the triggers for competition were designed in ways that catch low-quality programs but also catch other good programs.

Read More

2012 Data, 2013 Data, Service Area Demographics, Web App Reports

Sonoma County, CA – Head Start Demographics

Based on 2013 ACS data, the Sonoma County service area has experienced a 31% increase in the estimated number of income eligible children from 2010-2013 and has only 1 funded Head Start slot for every 2.6 estimated income eligible children, though this does not take into account enrollment opportunities available through California’s state funded pre kindergarten program. Community Action Partnership of Sonoma County has only been able to serve as much as 36% of the Head Start eligible population, with a funded enrollment of 520. An overview of Sonoma County demographics is in the tables and charts below.

Sonoma County, CA – 2013 Estimated Head Start Eligible Children heat map
Sonoma County, CA – 2013 Estimated Head Start Eligible Children heat map

View full interactive map

2013 5 Year ACS Overview
Area: Sonoma County, CA
Total Population: 487,427
Population under the age of 5: 5.64%
Poverty rate for families with children under the age of 5: 13.27% (Nation at 18.44%)
Estimated Head Start Eligible: 1,598

Head Start Funded Enrollment: 520

Estimated Early Head Start Eligible: 2,397


Selected Racial Characteristics

Sonoma County, CA – 2013 Racial Characteristics from the 5-Year ACS
Sonoma County, CA – 2013 Racial Characteristics from the 5-Year ACS
2013 5 Year ACS Not Hispanic or Latino and:
Sonoma County, CA Total Percent
White Alone: 320,797 90.89%
Black or African American alone: 6,877 1.95%
American Indian and Alaska Native Alone: 3,636 1.03%
Asian Alone: 19,101 5.41%
Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone: 1,540 .44%
Some other race alone: 986 0.28%

Contact Us with questions or to request your program’s demographic report. The 2012 version of your program’s report is offered free of charge to demonstrate our capabilities.

2013 Data, Web App Reports

Kern County – Bakersfield, CA Head Start Demographics

Based on 2013 ACS data, Kern County appears to be underfunded with about 2.6 estimated Head Start eligible children for every one Head Start slot, though this doesn’t take into account enrollment opportunities available through the California State Preschool Program. Below is an overview of the county’s demographics. A complete 2010-2012 report can be found here.

Kern County/Bakersfield, CA - 2013 Estimated Head Start Eligible Children heat map
Kern County/Bakersfield, CA – 2013 Estimated Head Start Eligible Children heat map

View full interactive map

2013 5 Year ACS Overview
Area: Kern County, CA
Total Population: 838,867
Population under the age of 5: 8.7%
Poverty rate for families with children under the age of 5: 25.05% (Nation at 18.44%)
Estimated Head Start Eligible: 7,577

Head Start Funded Enrollment: 2,348

Estimated Early Head Start Eligible: 10,969

Early Head Start Funded Enrollment: 244


Selected Racial Characteristics – See More

Kern County, CA – 2013 Racial Characteristics from the 5-Year ACS
Kern County, CA – 2013 Racial Characteristics from the 5-Year ACS
2013 5 Year ACS Not Hispanic or Latino and:
Kern County, CA Total Percent
White Alone: 323,341 79.07%
Black or African American alone: 44,616 10.91%
American Indian and Alaska Native Alone: 5,307 1.3%
Asian Alone: 33,509 8.19%
Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone: 917 .22%
Some other race alone: 1,231 0.3%

Contact Us with questions or to request your program’s demographic report. The 2012 version of your program’s report is offered free of charge to demonstrate our capabilities.